…This is a quote by Albert Einstein I just happened to find on my Facebook feed earlier this summer. I will talk about this in much more detail in a separate blog post but it felt like a good quote for the tone of this post.

…We are at a point in time where open hostility towards all things God-related is not only encouraged but is considered “acceptible” by the majority of Social Media. You can’t openly discuss God, the Bible or religion in social media threads without being attacked or ridiculed simply for mentioning it. Many high-profile websites either keep religious conversation segregated in one part of their forums or ban the conversation outright.

It’s easy to understand why many websites heavily moderate political conversations. As long as there are people with differing opinions and viewpoints, there will always be the potential for conflict. With Religion, the topic is avoided entirely though the reasons for this depend on who you ask. It’s like I said in this blog post a few weeks ago: Social Media isn’t a good place to have a serious discussion.

This brings me the main topic: What DO non-religious non-believers think about the Bible?

I’ve watched a few Christian programs in which this difficult subject was confronted head-on. The recurring theme is many don’t trust it at all because of how they’ve seen it used by people who identify themselves as Christian. Understandable and also disappointing for all Christians worldwide. Jesus set the example and most refuse to follow it in how they should behave around non-believers. To too many, they feel they are being judged by their Bible-believing counterparts and are made to feel “ignorant” or “stupid” for “not getting” what they have come to know. This is what you call having a poor teacher. It’s a shame as many have been turned off completely from understanding what the Bible says about today’s issues. Issues that have been foretold centuries in advance and revealed by God to his chosen people.

Speaking of which, there are also those who question or rebuke Biblical Prophecy. In very recent years, there has been a renewed effort from Evolutionists to fully discredit certain events foretold in the Bible. The reason for this is obvious: They’ve come true or are coming true exactly as foretold. A Prophecy is not a Prediction: A prediction is a foretelling of what MIGHT happen. A Prophecy is a foretelling of what WILL happen. There is a clear difference.

These efforts are in response to the renewed interest in Christianity in America because of Tyler Perry, Tim Tebow and movies such as The Passion of The Christ. What Biblical events have been called into question? Here’s a short list:

  • The 10 Plagues of Egypt + The Red Sea Crossing: There was a Docudrama that aired on the History Channel–which clearly had Christians in mind–made the case the 10 Plagues described in Exodus were all caused by a volcanic eruption in the Mediterranean Sea, which caused a drought that made the Red Sea crossable. The problem with that theory: The plagues ONLY effected the Egyptians. The Israelites were spared. In case you’re wondering, they expained water turning “blood red” by saying it was caused by mineral deposits mixed with mud. The problem, again is ONLY the Egyptians were affected by all of the plagues. The Docudrama offered no explaination for this clear oversight on its part.  In addition, the Red Sea returned to its bed after the Israelites safely crossed it. Again, no explaination was given.
  • Noah’s Ark + The Flood: Evolutionists concede there WAS a worldwide flood–but it allegedly happened millions of years earlier. They make the case there is “no fossil record” to back up a post-dinosaur mass extinction. This despite the flood itself being supported by the histories of several Middle Eastern and African countries. Parts of the ark itself have also been recovered, refuting all doubt the cataclysmic event actually took place.
  • The Four Empires of the Ancient World: I’m referring to Babylon, Persia, Greece and Rome. Yes, people actually question if the Bible got this right despite parts of it coming to pass in the Bible. Daniel is in Babylon when Cyrus–who was named as the one to conquer Babylon 150 years before he was born earlier in an earlier passage–conquers the city. Those who know their history knows the Persian Army marched under the city’s gates by diverting the river that ran through Babylon. This was also foretold in the Bible. God leaves no room for doubt when it comes to Prophecy.
  • “Babylon will never be Rebuilt”: Those who know the story of Daniel revealing King Nebuchadnezzar’s dream know this was the bold prophecy that to this day has NEVER been broken. “The city would lie in ruins, never be rebuilt and no one will live there.” Efforts have been made to defy this prophecy, though: Cyrus, the Persian Emperor tried to rebuild the city but the project was later abandoned. Alexander the Great hoped to rebuild it and make it a summer home but the project was abandoned when he died. Most recently, Iraq President Saddam Hussein attempted to rebuilt Babylon but his efforts were stopped by the U.S. Invasion in 2002. Coincidence? God doesn’t do “coincoincidences”.
  • Europe would never unite”: There have been fervent efforts in this regard over the last 100 years in particular. The reason is pretty obvious: World Wars 1 and 2. Remember the Euro? Great Britain was the only country that refused to switch their currency to the Euro. This ended up being a good thing for them when the country voted to leave the European Union a few months ago. “As Iron does not mix with clay, the nations will not cleave to one another”. Even before this era, efforts were made in the past to unite the continent in different ways. French Emperor Napoleon Bonepart came close. The night before he was going to claim victory, he said “only an act of God could stop him”. That’s exactly what happened the very next day: Due to heavy rains that slowed his forces considerably, Napoleon’s army was routed at the Battle of Waterloo.

 

…There are also those who are bothered by what happens to three people in the Old Testament: Cain, Abel and Job:

Cain and Abel were the first brothers in human history. Cain would also become the first murderer when he killed his brother Abel. Cain was a farmer and Abel was a sheperd. The brothers offered a sacrifice to God. God was pleased with Abel’s offering but not Cain’s. Jealous, Cain later killed his brother. When God confronted him, Cain showed no remorse for what he did. God punished him accordingly. He cursed Cain to wander the Earth for the rest of his life. In addition, God put a mark on Cain so that those who see him will not kill him.

…Some are bothered by both the idea God “put Cain in a lose-lose situation” and the idea “Abel had to die for Cain to be taught a lesson”. Some go so far as to say Cain “was justified because God wanted blood, which he could never give”. None are ever suggested in the Bible. God even told Cain to just do better next time before he did the deed. That aside, Jesus’ death on the cross marked the end of animal sacrifices. The Lamb of God’s death at Calvary redeemed mankind past, present and future.

 

Job’s story is a fascinating one. The story goes, Satan made a bet with God. He said Job only loves him because of all that he has been blessed with. He said Job would curse his name if he lost all of his blessings. This is an interesting situation in which God is challenged to put his faith in Job’s faith in him. God accepts the challenge under the condition Job’s life is spared. Immediately afterward, Job loses everything: His children are all killed in freak accidents, his crops fail, his animals die off and his friends leave him. Hie wife tells him to curse God and die but he rebukes her and continues to profess is trust in The Lord. God is satisfied but Satan ups the ante, afflicting Job with sores from head to toe. His wife is fearful but Job refuses to give up the faith. Having seen enough, God intervenes and not only restores all Job lost but gives him double what he had before.

…There are two main points to be drawn from Job’s story: The first and most obvious is God is not “A mean kid with a magnifying glass” like so many non-believers truly think. God is not the cause of evil in this world. There is more at stake than you can begin to imagine and Job’s story gives you a peek into that. Now you’re probably thinking “why didn’t God just say no?” He certasinly could have, but there was a lesson to be learned here. Not for Job (who was ignorant of the bet between God and Satan) but the reader, which brings me to my second point. The second point is there will be times in your life where everything goes horribly wrong in your life. It’s easy to place blame. What Job did contradicted the usual reflex. He praised God as his sufferings continued to multiply. He would have been right to curse God for allows his suffering but he did not. THAT is what it means to have faith in God. Not just in the good times but the bad times as well.

 

The Bible makes the case there IS hope in placing your trust in God. Contrary to the dangerous rhetoric too many evangelicals like to preach, God wants his creations to love him willingingly, not out of fear. I’ll speak more to this in a separate post but this is one of many dangerous ideologies that is running rampant in so many Christian denominations worldwide. Far too often, many are decieved by those who cherrypick verses from the Bible. While the intentions are usually good, there is a saying I keep in mind: Misinformation is more dangerous than no information. This is also the second post in a row I did not quote a particular verse. I didn’t because I did not deem it necessary for the topic of discussion.

I believe the Bible speaks for itself but I also believe those who truly want to know about it are obligated to read it and learn from it for themselves. Don’t go by what others say. Even when I was learning certain texts as a kid, I would find myself continuing to read beyond the group text. God will give you the wisdom to know what you are reading. No one else can do this for you.

…I will likely spend the next few posts going through a variety of topics. If you have something you’d like to see discussed, feel free to comment below.

 

 

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